Tag Archives: chicken

Pastured Poultry Week

Third Annual Pastured Poultry Week

Georgia chefs and farmers will be coming together in July to celebrate humane and sustainable practices of raising poultry during Pastured Poultry Week.

The event, now in its third year, aims to raise awareness of the chickens’ treatment and its impact. From Monday, July 7th through Sunday, July 13th more than 40 restaurants will be offering special menu items featuring pastured poultry from several of the state’s farms.

Pastured Poultry Week“The goal is to help bring a focus to the many benefits of choosing pastured poultry, such as the high welfare of the chickens and the positive impact on both human health and the environment, not to mention its superior taste,” says Shaun Doty of Bantam + Biddy, an event organizer and early pioneer of pastured poultry efforts in Georgia.

Participating restaurants in Atlanta include Bantam + Biddy, 4th & Swift, Gunshow, Empire State South, Holeman and Finch, The Optimist, Miller Union, Murphy’s and Aria.

Click here for a full list of participating restaurants and farms

Pastured Poultry Week is organized by Compassion in World Farming, a global organization working to end factory farming, and Georgians for Pastured Poultry, which aims to make Georgia the leader in the production and consumption of pastured poultry.

New York City and Charleston will also be celebrating Pastured Poultry Week. Click here for more information.

To learn more about Compassion in World Farming and its campaigns visit ciwf.com.

Third Annual Pastured Poultry Week, Monday, July 7 through Sunday, July 13, 2014.

SMASH Kitchen & Bar Now Open

Satisfy your appetite no matter what you’re craving at SMASH Kitchen & Bar, now open in Town Brookhaven. The modern casual American restaurant is the newest concept from the Here to Serve Restaurants group, and features smash hits from owner Tom Catherall’s other Atlanta eateries.

Smash Kitchen & BarFlatbreads, steaks and burgers are the main attractions on SMASH’s menu. The flatbreads are cooked in a wood burning oven, and range from the Classic Margherita to the Diablo, a spicy mix of chorizo, coppa salume and hot chili peppers.

It may be hard to decide between the Steak Burger and the SKB Burger. Your decision will be even tougher when you scroll down the menu and see the “Smash it Down,” shaved prime rib served with BBQ sauce and horseradish slaw. For non meat eaters there’s the Veggie Burger, made in house with brown deviled eggs, bacon, pimento cheeserice, black beans, beets and quinoa.

In addition to a selection of steaks there are baby back ribs and pork chops. There’s also skillet fried chicken, jumbo lump crab cake, grilled salmon and a variety of salads and sides (we told you there was something to match any craving).

Click here to see SMASH Kitchen & Bar’s lunch, dinner and brunch menus

Brunch offers a menu that’s as fun to order as it is tasty. Try the Baked Frenchman (bread pudding french toast), the Mad Italian Skillet Scramble (coppa, mozzarella and chili flakes topped with basil, baby arugula and tomato), or the Gravedigger (chicken fried pork chop with fried egg, mushroom, sausage, gravy and a cheddar cheese biscuit). Of course you can’t go wrong with the SKB Chicken & Waffles, which comes with a decadent pecan bacon syrup.

flatbreadIf you’re in the mood for drinks or light bites, take a right past the host stand and you’ll find a great list of wines, beer and cocktails at SMASH’s bar.

The décor for the bar and restaurant is a mix of cozy and eclectic. Brick walls, red booths and SMASH burgera window into the kitchen give Smash a casual feel, while a unique mix of art, chandeliers and a larger than life ‘eat’ sign make it feel like an escape from the shopping center outside.

The Here to Serve Restaurants group includes Prime, Noche, Goldfish, Twist, Shout, Strip, Aja, Coast Seafood and Raw Bar and Cantina. Later this fall H2SR will open Shucks, an upscale oyster and wine bar, also in Town Brookhaven.

Looking for a unique holiday gift? Here to Serve Restaurants is partnering with Atlanta shops and destinations for the 5 Star Package. A $100 gift certificate to any Here to Serve restaurant will come with an additional $100 in coupons to Spa Sydell, Fab’rik clothing boutique, the Alliance Theater and the Cook’s Warehouse. 5 Star Package cards will be available for purchase at each partner location and online at www.h2sr.com and the 5 Star partners’ websites.

Smash Kitchen & Bar, 804 Town Boulevard, Suite 1010 in Town Brookhaven, Atlanta, 30319. (404) 841-4221

>> Connect: @SmashATL and @H2SRestaurants on Twitter
Facebook: www.facebook.com/smashATL

images below and of food above from Here to Serve Restaurants

Bantam + Biddy Brings Pastured Poultry to Ansley

It is probably a good sign when a new restaurant that primarily serves poultry is packed the night before Thanksgiving.

Bantam + Biddy is the latest restaurant from chefs Shaun Doty (Yeah! Burger) and Lance Gummere (The Shed at Glenwood). The fast casual concept located in Ansley Mall celebrates heritage breed chicken – and takes its name from them.

The business lunch and family-friendly eatery features all-natural, pastured poultry and seasonal, organic vegetables.

The menu includes a Snacks + Soup section, salads and sandwiches plus chicken, pork and grass-fed beef entrees. Dishes to try include the Spicy Wings ($8), Rotisserie Chicken Penne Pasta ($12) and the Chicken Salad Banh Mi ($10). Rotisserie chicken is offered in quarter or half portions ($10 or $14), along with a selection of homemade sauces.

Specialty cocktails are described on a large chalkboard next to the counter where you place your order. Soda, beer and wine are also offered.

Bantam + Biddy will begin serving breakfast on December 3rd with a mouthwatering menu that features organic eggs.

Bantam + Biddy, Ansley Mall, 1544 Piedmont Road, Suite 301, Atlanta.
(404) 907-3469

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A Family Favorite: Ethiopian Food

It’s one of my family’s most cherished food traditions: sharing a delicious meal at our favorite Ethiopian restaurant in New York City. It started in the early 1990s with my first taste of Ethiopian food in Washington, D.C. and has become a meal my family looks forward to. My sister orders the food, I control the plate of bread, my mom takes the chicken meat off the bone so it’s easier to eat and my dad finishes all the lentil and vegetable dishes. We eat almost everything in front of us and complain how full we are for hours after the meal. Yum.

My sister and I have become vary particular about our Ethiopian food outings. We don’t invite just anyone into our dining group. No fast eaters (they’d finish everything before we got our fill), and no one who would be frightened by our carnivorous, overeating ways.

If you’ve never tried Ethiopian food, you wouldn’t understand my family’s enthusiasm. A meal at an Ethiopian restaurant is something everyone should experience. Even finicky eaters should give it a try – the taste is too good to resist.

If you like the spice and complex flavors of Indian food, you’ll like Ethiopian food – though the two taste nothing alike. It may not look that appetizing but the flavors are intense. Chicken, beef, lamb and vegetables are mixed with peppers, herbs and spices that create a bold and savory taste. You don’t use utensils; you pick up the food with injera, a flat, spongy bread that resembles a crepe and tastes like sourdough. The intense flavors of the food with the tangy taste of the injera is a combination I often find myself craving.

When my family goes out for Ethiopian food we always order the same dishes: doro wat, gomen besega, special tibs and a vegetable dish of green beans and carrots sautéed in a tomato sauce.

Doro wat is chicken stewed in a spicy berbere sauce and is served with a hard-boiled egg. Simply put, berbere sauce is really really good. It’s made with chili pepper, ginger, cloves, cardamom and other spices. If you enjoy wines that have big and complex flavors, you’ll like berbere sauce. The sauce is so big it’s hard to identify all the elements that combine for its taste.

Gomen besega is beef sautéed with collard greens. The collard greens are what make this dish. They have a delicious and slightly tart taste that refreshes your mouth after a bite of the spicy berbere sauce. I’ve tried to recreate the taste in my own kitchen with a mix of lemon juice and spices but haven’t come close.

If it’s your first time at an Ethiopian restaurant and you’re dining with one other person I recommend ordering doro wat and gomen besega to split.

Special tibs is chunks of lamb sautéed with onions, tomatoes and green pepper. It looks simple but the taste is an explosion of flavor. I like to dip it in the berbere sauce when the chicken and egg are gone.

The dishes are served together on one big platter for sharing. On the bottom is injera, which soaks up the sauce and tastes great when you’re getting towards the end of the meal. The food comes with a few side dishes; this past weekend it was two lentil dishes and collard greens flavored differently than the greens in the gomen besega.

It didn’t matter that my family had eaten a huge Thanksgiving dinner two nights before or that we started saying we were getting full halfway through – we finished nearly everything on the platter, including the injera on the bottom (the evidence is to the left). Each time we go out for Ethiopian food it’s the same – I eat way too much and am uncomfortably full for hours. I can’t help myself! The food tastes so good that I keep eating it until it’s gone.

If you don’t live in a city it may be hard to find an Ethiopian restaurant. If there is one in your area you should definitely make dinner plans. My family goes to Meskerem on West 47th Street, between 9th and 10th Avenues in New York City. There are a few other Ethiopian restaurants in Manhattan. In Washington, D.C. you’ll find a bunch of Ethiopian restaurants in Adams Morgan. I’ve only found one restaurant in Miami: Sheba Ethiopian Restaurant, located in the Design District. The restaurant is currently closed and it’s not clear if or when it will reopen.

I’ve found recipes for injera and my favorite Ethiopian dishes online. I hope to try them sometime to see if I can recreate the great tastes in my own kitchen.