Tag Archives: Trebbiano

Winter Whites: White Wines in Season

White wine is in season even when the weather is cool. Here are five white wines to try tonight:

Craggy Range Kidnappers Vineyard Chardonnay 2011
Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
13% alcohol
$22

If you think the only white wine that comes from New Zealand is Sauvignon Blanc, you’re missing out. Craggy Range produces delicious single vineyard Chardonnay on the North Island.

This wine comes from Hawkes Bay, New Zealand’s second largest winegrowing region. The grapes were mostly harvested by hand, and the wine spent five months aging in 12% new French oak barrels.

Reminiscent of Chablis, the Craggy Range Kidnappers Vineyard Chardonnay has citrus and white peach aromas. Lemon, grapefruit and tart white apricot flavors mingle with vanilla and a hint of almond, with lively acidity and chalky minerality giving the wine a bright finish. It’s the happy medium for people who can’t decide between a stainless steel or oaked Chardonnay.

 

Vincent Gaudry Le Tournebride Sancerre 2010
Sancerre, France
12.5% alcohol
$25

All wines tell a story, and this French wine has a dynamic – that is, biodynamic – one. Vincent Gaudry’s wines come from the Sancerre AOC in the eastern part of the Loire region, in central France. The domaine has passed from father to son for several generations; they began farming organically in 1993. Today the domaine is not only certified organic, but it is certified biodynamic too —  Gaudry cuts wood for his barrels only on days suggested by the biodynamic calendar, and the wines are bottled according to the lunar calendar. There are no artificial yeasts or additives in the wine, and the wine is not filtered. What you drink is a true expression of the place where the wine came from.

Le Tournebride, named for a small path leading to the domaine, is 100% Sauvignon Blanc. The grapes came from 30 year old vines that grow in limestone and marl soil. The wine was fermented in tanks, then spent eight months on the lees before bottling.

The nose of Le Tournebride Sancerre is a mix of citrus and tropical fruit. Flavors of lemon, peach, pineapple and tart lychee unfold on the palate, with a hint of Marcona almond on the lingering finish. Well balanced acidity and refreshing minerality make this wine a pleasant sip.

 

Barbi Orvieto 2011
Umbria, Italy
12.5% alcohol
$18

Orvieto is both the name of a region in central Italy and the wine produced there. White Orvieto can be a blend of several grapes; the Barbi Orvieto is a blend of Grechetto (40%), Procanico (30%, also known as Trebbiano), Verdello (10%), Malvasia (10%), and Vermentino (10%). These combine to make a wine that is crisp, refreshing and aromatic, with a slight touch of sweetness adding a lift at the end of each sip.

The grapes in the Barbi Orvieto were grown in vineyards that are 960 feet above sea level, in clay and sandy soil that is rich in fossils. Fermentation was stopped early to retain some residual sugar.

Melon and honeysuckle aromas introduce a palate of honeydew, green apple, yellow pear and a hint of white pepper. Vibrant acidity gives the Barbi Orvieto a lively mouthfeel and a clean finish.

 

Halter Ranch Côtes de Paso Blanc 2011
Paso Robles, California
14.2% alcohol
$25

If winter weather has you feeling down, try the Côtes de Paso Blanc from Halter Ranch. Its fragrant floral aromas will make you feel like spring is already in bloom.

Rhône grapes shine in Paso Robles, the Central California region where Halter Ranch Winery is located. This wine is a blend of Grenache Blanc (33%), Roussanne (26%), Picpoul Blanc (20%), Marsanne (12%), and Viognier (9%). After fermentation in French oak barrels, the wine spent four months aging on the lees in 100% neutral French oak barrels.

Aromas of white flowers and peach expand on the palate, along with flavors of white apricot, jasmine, orange blossom and toasted hazelnut. Elegant with refreshing minerality and a satisfying finish, the Côtes de Paso Blanc is a white wine that is sure to cheer you up on a cold day.

 

Standing Stone Vineyards Riesling 2011
Finger Lakes, New York
11.7% alcohol
$14

The Finger Lakes region in upstate New York is becoming the go-to spot for new and exciting Riesling. Even the president is a fan – on Monday a Finger Lakes Riesling was served at President Obama’s inaugural luncheon.

Standing Stone Vineyards is located on the east side of Seneca Lake. The grapes for the 2011 Riesling were fermented in stainless steel tanks using three different yeasts. The final wine is a blend from the lots, which brings together the most desirable characteristic of each.

This off-dry Riesling is wonderfully aromatic with notes of ripe citrus, tropical fruits and wildflower honey. On the palate are flavors of tangerine, sweet grapefruit, guava and mango. Gentle acidity balances out the sweetness, and flinty minerality makes for a clean finish.

More White Wines | Red Wines | More Under $20

Soave: A White Wine for Mad Men

Classic cocktails naturally come to mind when looking for something to drink while watching Mad Men. But what if wine is more your style?

Fans of the AMC series can get into the ‘60s mood by sipping Soave, a white wine from northern Italy.

Soave was a popular wine in the 1960s, featured in Fellini’s “La Dolce Vita” and loved by Frank Sinatra. Apparently the singer only went to restaurants that had his preferred brand of Soave on the list.

Soave takes its name from the Soave region, a DOC (Denominazione d’Orgine Controlata) in the Veneto in northeast Italy. It is made mainly from Garganega grapes, along with Trebbiano di Soave.

Soave is an easy to enjoy and affordable alternative to Pinot Grigio or Sauvignon Blanc. Fresh and food-friendly, Soave can have citrus, melon, floral and nutty flavors, with mineral notes and vibrant acidity.

In addition to Mad Men, Soave pairs well with a range of foods including seafood, poultry and pasta.

Here are a few bottles of Soave to try:

Bolla Soave Classico
Frank Sinatra’s favorite Soave has flavors of white flowers, pear and lemon, with a hint of almond on the finish and a price tag of less than $10.

Suavia Soave Classico
Fresh aromas introduce delicate flavors of peach, green apple, spring flowers and a touch of anise.

Montresor Soave Capitel Alto
Rich with intense aromas and flavors, this wine has notes of pear, apple and white peach.

Simply Italian: Tasting Notes from the Italian Wine Tour

By Maxine Howard

Italian winemakers and their representatives took over the St. Regis Hotel in San Francisco earlier this autumn for the Simply Italian great wine tour. With stops in Chicago and Las Vegas, the tour offered the chance to share the wide variety of magic Italian winemakers weave with their grapes.

More than fifty wineries from all over Italy poured their best wines at seminars and the grand tasting. While some were established labels, others came to the United States to find importers for their brands.

Seminars highlighted the range of grapes grown and the full gamut of wines produced all over Italy. At one session fourteen wines took participants on a fascinating tour. We started with non-vintage Prosecco from Carpenè Malvolti that demonstrated the fruity aroma yet dry finish of this sparkling wine.

Moving through a procession of increasingly complex whites, we continued to some remarkable reds. The 2005 Rubesco Riserva Vigna Monticchio from Cantine Giorgio Lungarotti, a blend of 70% Sangiovese and 30% Canaiolo, was one of the most complex of the tasting with notes of dark cherries and silky tannins. The 2006 Mille E Una Notte (meaning 1001 nights) from Donnafugata was another spectacular red blend. This contained 90% Nero d’Avola and 10% of “the best grapes harvested at Contessa Entellina in 2006.” The aroma was of dark fruits and the taste had a great balance of fruit and earthiness with a slight tannic finish.

Simply Italian might be a misnomer, as the variety of grapes, wines and regions was anything but simple. Among the variety of interesting wines here are several that stood out:

Perla Del Garda is a small producer from Lonato, a town in Lombardy in northern Italy. Coming from generations of farmers, this brother/sister team started releasing their own wines only a few years ago. Their white wine, Perla 2009, comes from the Lugana region within Lombardy. It is produced from Trebbiano grapes. Very tasty, the wine was crisp and flinty with a slightly smoky touch. Their red, Terre Lunari, is a blend consisting of 80% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Cabernet Franc. It showed nice fruit, tempered by the earthiness of the Cabernet Franc and soft tannins.

From the island of Sardinia came Argiolas with flavorful, distinctive wines. The 2010 Costamolino is a white wine made from the Vermentino grape. It had notes of tropical fruit with a slight sweetness reminded me of a Riesling. The 2008 Perdera comes primarily from Monica grapes. It had a gorgeous deep red color, with dark fruit flavors culminating with a peppery finish. The 2005 Turriga is 85% Cannonau grapes with 5% each of Carignano, Bovale Sardo and Malvasia Nera. This medium bodied, food friendly wine was one of my favorites.

Valentina Cubi brought a great range of wines using basically the same grapes from the Veneto region in northeast Italy. I was impressed at the different tastes that are all called Valpolicella (the name of the region within Veneto). The 2009 Iperico was a lighter red with nice flavor. It was made from 65% Corvina, 25% Rondinella and 10% Molinara. The 2004 Morar was a well made, full bodied wine of greater complexity. It was composed of 70% Corvina, 25% Corvinone and 5% Rondinella. The third Valpolicella, a 2005 Arusnatico, had the same composition as the Iperico but tasted altogether different. The distinction is that the Arusnatico undergoes a second fermentation on the stems in February. This treatment produces a deep red, well-structured wine that is both fruity and spicy. It fills the mouth and finishes with silky tannins.

For a wine lover constantly in search of new tastes, this mini tour of the varieties of Italian wine beyond Pinot Grigio and Chianti was quite a revelation. I recommend trying bottles from different grape varieties to compare with your old standards for a fresh experience.

——————————————————————–

Maxine Howard is the West Coast correspondent for the Amateur Gastronomer.